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BLANCHFIELD ARMY COMMUNITY HOSPITAL
U.S. ARMY MEDICAL DEPARTMENT
Our History

Original Blanchfield Army Community Hospital

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Fort Campbell opened its first hospital on August Aug. 19, 1942, known as the United States Army Hospital at Fort Campbell, Ky. The hospital had an operating capacity of 2,100 beds to support the troop needs of Camp Campbell. The hospital was housed in a wood frame structure using a World War II cantonment design consisting of 53 brick veneered two-story buildings extending over 73 acres of land. The complex included more than seven miles of ramps and corridors. For forty years through World War II, Korea, and Vietnam, this hospital and staff provided care to Soldiers and Families.

Current BACH

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On Sept. 17, 1982, the current hospital was officially dedicated. The architecture and design of the building was among the most modern of its day. The hospital opened with 10 patient care units and a capacity to care for 241 hospitalized patients.

The hospital was dedicated in remembrance of Col. Florence A. Blanchfield, Chief of the Army Nurse Corps from 1943-1947. Col. Blanchfield played a prominent role in World War II by placing nursing teams close to the front lines to provide expert nursing care to battlefield casualties and was instrumental in attaining permanent commissioned officer status for military nurses. Blanchfield Army Community Hospital is unique in the U. S. Army Medical Department as the only hospital named after an Army Nurse Corps officer. Col. Florence Blanchfield was the first woman to receive a regular Army Commission.